Greening Milwaukee recommends a number of organizations and websites for further information on trees and greening.

Resources

Milwaukee Forestry Division – The Forestry Division is responsible for the design, planning, planting, and management of street trees, boulevards, landscapes, greenspaces, and beautification projects within the City of Milwaukee. It aims to efficiently manage the urban landscape to provide a better quality of life for citizens and visitors. This effort seeks to maximize the environmental and psychological benefits of the urban forest, while enhancing both landscape and property values.The division is responsible for the management of all shade and ornamental trees growing along city streets and boulevards which constitutes approximately 200,000 trees. Forestry manages vegetation on 121.8 miles of boulevards, 57 totlots, 59 greenspaces, 20 designated municipal properties, and 20 Downtown above-ground planters. They also serve as a resource to other agencies in greenspace design, implementation and maintenance.For more information on the forestry division and some useful information related to plants & trees in your neighborhood, visit their website.

The Urban Ecology Center – The Urban Ecology Center is a neighborhood-based, nonprofit community center located in Milwaukee’s historic Riverside Park. Using this living laboratory, the Urban Ecology Center provides environmental science programs to neighborhood schools, promotes environmental awareness in the community, preserves and enhances the natural resources of Riverside Park, and protects the Milwaukee River.Urban Ecology Center’s outdoor laboratory (part of Riverside Park) consists of 12 acres of wooded land and riparian habitat on the east bank of the Milwaukee River. The resource center and classroom is a short walk from the natural area This building is home to live animals, informational exhibits, and resource material about the Center and surrounding area.The Urban Ecology Center is located between the Riverwest and East Side communities, one of the most populated and diverse areas in Milwaukee.

Website: https://urbanecologycenter.org/

Alliance for Community Trees (ACT) – Alliance for Community Trees’ mission is to create the national support network for grassroots, citizen-based, non-profit organizations dedicated to urban and community tree planting, care, conservation, and education. ACT offers membership to non-profit urban forestry organizations that have been in existence or affiliated with a 501(c)(3) organization for a minimum of one year prior to application for membership and whose purpose is to promote urban and community forestry through citizen action. Currently, 34 non-profit organizations are members of ACT. It offers educational workshops on fund raising topics, focusing on peer support and the development of the urban and community forestry movement nationwide.

Website: http://www.actrees.org/index.php

The International Society of Arboriculture (ISA), has served the tree care industry for over seventy years as a scientific and educational organization. ISA was founded in 1924 when a group of forty individuals, each engaged in a phase of tree work or research, were called together by the Connecticut Tree Protection Examining Board to discuss shade tree problems and their possible solutions. It was during this meeting this group identified a need for gathering tree care information and to provide a means for its dissemination. The National Shade Tree Conference (NSTC) was founded soon thereafter.

NSTC experienced gradual growth until 1929 when the economy in the United States collapsed and membership in the young organization sank to fourteen and continued to look bleak for several years, but in 1936, membership grew from thirty-three the previous year to one hundred forty-seven. With few exceptions, steady growth has been seen every year since.

The name was changed to the International Society of Arboriculture in 1976.
ISA continues to be a dynamic medium through which arborists around the world share their experience and knowledge for the benefit of society. ISA, aligned on many fronts with other green organizations, is working hard to foster a better understanding of trees and tree care through research and the education of professionals as well as global efforts to inform tree care consumers.

Website: http://www.isa-arbor.com/

Tree Care Industry Association – The Tree Care Industry Association (TCIA), formerly the National Arborist Association (NAA), provides a website with information on tree care. It publishes the Tree Care Industry magazine and holds a TCI Expo yearly. It also offers several other newsletters and publications geared towards tree care workers for members only.

Website: www.natlarb.com

Information on Tree Conservation, the Benefits of Tree Conservation, Tree Conservation Activities and links to other conservation groups and organizations.

Website:  www.topiarytree.net/whitepaper/tree_conservation.html